Pianos by Decorators

Pleyel Pianos have a long tradition of collaborations with creatives from all eras to reflect the modernity of their instruments, to sustain and develop their know-how with the ambition of creating pianos with strong musical and aesthetic identities.
Beginning with Art Nouveau, the culminating period of this approach was that of the decorative arts movement which was led by some of the greatest interior designers of the time such as Jacques‐Émile Ruhlmann, Pierre Legrain, René Herbst, Paul Follot or René Prou.
Since the early 2000s, Pleyel Pianos have reconnected with this movement of creation and modernity by turning towards the world of design and art and inviting contemporary creatives to design original instruments, since a piano is not only an exceptional object but also an instrument offering a fourth dimension, that of the creative sound of living, timeless and universal music.

1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Replica of the original

1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Replica of the original

Replica of the original Pleyel piano of 1937 designed by the famous interior designer-cabinet worker Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann.

Year of first production: 2009.

Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann was the undisputed genius of 20th century decorative arts and naturally took an interest in pianos as part of his cabinetmaking work. This replica of an Art Deco piano with a timeless design pays the same attention to luxurious materials and refined technique: shapes which are full though never massive, slender lines, mahogany interior veneer, extremely pure contours in black lacquer, a black lacquer frame with an embossed Pleyel logo and a nickel-plated sculpted lyre.
This piano is a symbol of perfect cabinetmaking, utilitarian understanding, remarkably balanced lines and exquisite refinement.

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1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Red Naccarat

1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Red Naccarat

Special series in lacquer Red Naccarat - Replica of the original Pleyel piano of 1937 designed by the famous interior designer-cabinet worker Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann.

Year of first production: 2011. This was a special order for a private residence in Monaco.

Jacques Emile Ruhlmann was the undisputed genius of 20th century decorative arts and naturally took an interest in pianos as part of his cabinetmaking work. Eager to revive tastes for French-style furniture and interior decor, he created geometrical, trapezoidal and unadorned models to match the architecture and the furniture of various interiors. Made on special order for a renown interior design and decoration office in order to be placed on a residential house in Monaco, this contemporary version of the piano «1937» with its finish in a shiny red Nacarrat lacquer (8 layers) gives a modern twist to this timeless instrument.
The design of this piano highlights the refined know-how of the Pleyel craftsmen to conceive this instrument of trapezoidal form with a very deep red Naccarat lacquer outside as inside.

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1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Ebony of Macassar and Izombe

1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Ebony of Macassar and Izombe

Special series in ebony of Macassar and Izombe wood veneer - Replica of the original Pleyel piano of 1937 designed by the famous interior designer-cabinet worker Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann.

Year of first production: 2010. This was a special order for a yacht.

Jacques Emile Ruhlmann was the undisputed genius of 20th century decorative arts, who described himself as a “furniture maker” but was more a creator of artistic and intelligent furniture. Eager to revive tastes for French-style furniture and interior decor, Jacques Emile Ruhlmann naturally took an interest in pianos as part of his cabinetmaking work. Made on special order for a renown interior design and decoration office in order to be placed on a yacht (407 ft), this version of the piano « 1937 » differs by its veneer in ebony of Macassar associated with an inner veneer in izombe. The finish in high glossy varnish (12 layers) gives to the veneer an utmost depth. The fluted lyre, the sabots and the fittings are in polished nickel-plated steel.
This piano is a symbol of perfect cabinetmaking, utilitarian understanding, remarkably balanced lines and exquisite refinement.

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1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Rosewood and Sycamore

1937 by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann, Rosewood and Sycamore

Special series in rosewood and sycamore - Replica of the original Pleyel piano of 1937 designed by the famous interior designer-cabinet worker Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann.

Year of first production: 2012. This was a special order for a private residence in London.

Jacques Emile Ruhlmann was the undisputed genius of 20th century decorative arts and naturally took an interest in pianos as part of his cabinetmaking work.
This version of the piano « 1937 » pays the same attention to luxurious materials and refined technique: shapes which are full though never massive, slender lines, sycamore interior veneer, extremely pure contours in flamed rosewood lacquer, a high glossy varnish (12 layers) giving to the veneer an utmost depth, a black lacquer frame with an embossed Pleyel logo and a fluted lyre, sabots and fittings in polished nickel-plated steel.
The timeless design of this piano highlights the refined know-how of the Pleyel craftsmen to conceive an instrument from which the cabinetmaking comes to underline its Art deco style.

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Dream by Alberto Pinto

Dream by Alberto Pinto

Numbered Series - Ebony and Ivory

Year of production: 2012. One of the 3 models from the piano Dream decorator’s collection.

For that Collection, Alberto Pinto referred to sophisticated and refined arts of the 40s. Many details in the finishes enhance an extreme elegance: colour contrasts, material effects, selection of refined and precious materials, highlighting the rare craftsmanship of the Pleyel expertise.
“It is as a decorator, even as a stylist, that I approached the challenge, with a variety of suggestions for how to embellish the piano.
For the numbered series model, I opted for an elegant black and ivory tuxedo. It is seemingly simple, but conceals several finishing touches which add a great deal of character, including the contrast between the lacquer on the instrument’s internal and external surfaces. While the outside is based on an undulating design, the inside appears in the opposite colour, with a perfectly smooth finish. I also redesigned the legs to a scale that matches that of the object. In a sheath, and featuring a wooden ball, they are finely embellished with bronze finish brass inserts, subtly emphasizing their architecture.” Alberto Pinto

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